Svea 123 dating

On 4 August 1875, involved in collision with schooner Gippslander, Hobsons Bay, Port Phillip.

Hit the Fourth River bar, Tasmania, and continued her journey but dissapered at sea, 1850. In 1870, saw wreckage, possibly ship Harlech Castle.

Rivalry between the many shipping companies intensified as they fought, through advertisements extolling the virtues of their speedy and comfortable ships, for the lucrative new emigration trade.

No doubt risks were taken with the aim of turning a quick profit, and no doubt ships were lost. Known to have operated in Victorian waters in the 1890s.

The ladies sheltered him as best they could with their cloaks and umbrellas until a m,an and his St. The dog nestled close to Ponting and kept him warm while further assistance was sought. Captain Marr of the barque Britomart reported sighting wreckage drifting in Bass Strait that may have been from the missing vessel. Involved in collision with steamer Leura, Port Phillip Bay, 4 September 1908. Purchased by Port Phillip Sea Pilots in 1924 and renamed Akuna. On 11 February 1913, a vessel of this name was involved in collision with barque Arnoldus Vinnen, near Williamstown, Port Phillip. Sailed from Launceston for Port Phillip Bay on 23 September 1839 but failed to arrive. Built 1911 as the German yacht Comet; captured by the RAN off New Britain in 1914 and commissioned as the Una. In 1912, towed free the barque Joseph Craig, aground inside Point Nepean, Port Phillip. Westernport and Phillip Island have been included in this main list. The vessels scuttled in Bass Strait have been included in the Port Phillip listing. Victoria, of all states, seems to have the most documented shipwreck data, in public format at least.

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